T e v i o t d a l e     C l i p p e r    S h i p    6 0 4 4 4

 About the
 Clipper-Ship
 Teviotdale

 About her
 Ship-Builder:
 Barclay Curle

 Teviotdale:
 Voyage Mission  Statement

 About her
 Owners:
 J&A Roxburgh

 Teviotdale:
 Her Last Great
 Voyage

 Teviotdale:
 The Southern  Ocean

 Crew List on
 Final Voyage

 Extracts from
Able-Seaman
Jenkins Diary

 Prints Sales

 Book Sales

 Contributors

 Copyright
 Information


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Welcome to Book Sales where you can find information on how to purchase your copy of The Final Voyage of the Clipper Ship Teviotdale in 1876. Clipper Ship 60444 website is updated on a regular basis so do check back periodically to find out about our latest news.


What's inside:

Our book 'The Final Voyage of the Clipper Ship Teviotdale in 1876' tells of the true story of a voyage from Dundee in Scotland to Bombay in India. The account was written by the author's grandfather, George Jenkins who was a sailor in the merchant navy. George Jenkins was one of the 26 crew on board the ship, it had left the safe harbour of Camperdown Dock in Dundee, Scotland on 26th July 1876 and was headed for Bombay, India. The Teviotdale was loaded with a cargo of 1,800 tons of Scotch coals. Later in life, George wrote and talked about his frightening shipwreck and amazing human survival, he gave a lecture at a public meeting in the Tullibody Institute in 1909. Tullibody being a small town near where he lived, situated between Stirling and Alloa in Scotland. The lecture may have been given only once but was illustrated with some fabulous coloured lantern slides created from specially commissioned paintings by a local artist.


About the Book:

The Final Voyage of the Clipper Ship Teviotdale in 1876. A true account of a frightening shipwreck and incredible human survival. This book is the real-life story of George Jenkins, a young sailor from Dundee who in 1876 survives the terror of being shipwrecked at sea when his ship full of coal catches fire in the Indian Ocean. George's personal recollections of the fateful voyage of the Teviotdale are carefully transcribed by his grandson Stuart Jenkins and with additional research, verify the events with the official Board of Trade report and newspaper articles from the period.

The Teviotdale was designed and built in accordance with the very latest ‘fast cargo/clipper ship’ blueprint. She was built by the world renowned Clyde-side shipbuilders Barclay, Curle & Co of Glasgow, Scotland. Her first and only owner was J. & A. Roxburgh also of Glasgow. She looked very much like the Cutty Sark, both being built on the Clyde and launched in 1869. The Teviotdale was en-route from Dundee to Bombay (Mumbai).

Being shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean meant Captain Robert Jones and his chief officers had to navigate three small open boats across the vast expanse of the open ocean to find land. The crew rowed for days and nights and eventually sighted the Chagos Archipelago. All 27 crew members landed on a tiny atoll called Diego Garcia. Here the men survived for 54 days on a diet of mostly fish, turtle, eggs and cocoa nuts until they were finally rescued by a visiting ship from Mauritius.


About the Author:

When Stuart McEwen Jenkins was born in 1935 his family had moved to be near London so that his father could operate a haulage company, called Jenkins Express Removals, one of the first long-distance removals businesses to operate in the UK; his brother, James was in charge of the company’s Scottish office in Glasgow.
This was the time of the 1930s Depression and there was great demand for people to move house from one end of the country to the other. Consequently, due to the demand of the service from their business, Stuart’s family were comparatively well off, with the result that his father, a natural born engineer, could take up his interest in boats.
In about 1938 he bought a second-hand lifeboat from a yard in Southampton; he named the boat the Margaret. Stuart’s father had it converted into a comfortable 6-berth motor cruiser fitted with a petrol engine he had converted for marine use in his home garage workshop. Stuart has a childhood memory of him testing this engine with it spewing out coolant water on to the garage forecourt. He sailed the Margaret along the Channel coast to Fambridge-on-Crouch in Essex and he remembers his family having a good time sailing up and down the estuary on weekends.
During the war years Stuart’s father became a volunteer member of the Admiralty Small Boat Pool, which was vital in the success of the D-Day landings, from where he brought home a shell casing that had been fired during the Normandy landings. When he died in 1973 the base of this casing was incorporated into a memorial at the family grave site in Dysart Cemetery.
During the periods that his father spent at home he began to teach Stuart the basics of engineering which has stood him in good stead for all his life. In 1949 he gained a place at the Northampton Polytechnic Secondary Technical School in London for a 3-year engineering course followed by a further 3 years at the National College of Horology (NCH) where he obtained an Honours Diploma.
At the age of 19, Stuart became a graduate apprentice at Smiths Aircraft Instruments based in Cheltenham. During this time he studied for a National Certificate in Engineering with Endorsements and later became a Chartered Engineer (CEng).
National Service then followed for two years during which he was based at the Proof and Experimental Establishment based on Foulness Island where he had a great opportunity to make use of his engineering skills.
After National Service Stuart took a job with the Plessey company based in Havant, Hampshire, busy at the time making parts for radios and after a short time he moved on to their nearby Titchfield plant. In 1963, he took up a Senior Mechanical Engineer position with the GEC company based in Portsmouth and spent six years working on very interesting projects.
In 1969, Stuart became a project manager at the newly-established De la Rue Instruments factory in Portsmouth to develop cash dispensing machines. He spent 16 years with this company and was fortunate to work, mainly, with the NCR and Diebold companies based in the USA, and some European companies. During this period he was responsible for the multi-denomination cash dispenser design which has been incorporated in ‘all’ ATMs in use up to this day.
In 1985, Stuart started his own business ventures, starting with the design of a dot matrix destination blind for buses and went on to form a company designing combat identification ‘CID’ devices for military use. In all, Stuart has accumulated some 41 patents during his career.


Can you help?  

We would be delighted to hear from any decendants of crew-members who where on board the ship during its final, or any of its previous voyages. She had several captains over her short life, two we know of; Captain Nicol (officially logged at Wellington NZ, 26th August 1875) and Captain Robert Jones who set sail on 26th July 1876 from Camperdown Dock, Dundee.  This was to be the fateful and final voyage of the Teviotdale during which the ship was abandoned due to uncontrollable fire on board.  If you have any information about the Teviotdale 1876 Clipper Ship that you think we may be interested to hear about or include on our web-site, in please contact us.


Contact:

For all enquiries please contact:
stuartmcewenjenkins@gmail.com
and we will be back in touch with you shortly.

This page was last updated 24th April 2020.


New: Book now available!

Buy now....   Click on the front cover image below to read more about the book. to 'look-inside' and to buy direct from Amazon (opens in new window).

We are pleased to announce the publication of the story of the Teviotdale.  Here you will find a fascinating book giving a true account of a frightening shipwreck and an incredible human survival story from Able-seaman George Jenkins.  George was just 20 years old when he was shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean along with 26 of his shipmates.  Read about the real adventures of sailors aboard ship on the high seas in the 1870's.

The book The Final Voyage is available on-line from Amazon Books and other good bookshops such as: BookDepository, Blackwells, Waterstones and WHSmith.  The book is available in three forms: Paperback, hardback and as an e-book.

New book release ISBN's:
Paperback: 978-1-9160602-0-3 ssp £10.00
Hardback: 978-1-9160602-1-0 ssp £12.99
Kindle e-bk: 978-1-9160602-2-7 ssp £3.99


Book reviews....
(since 1st March 2020)


Here is what readers have said about the Teviotdale book so far. Got comments, please email them to us at:

What a great story, well written and researched. I have the pleasure of knowing the author and have enjoyed many discussions on the subject when walking our dogs. I'm sure the author has more publications in mind. Looking forward to the next one.

M.J. from Bognor Regis, West Sussex. UK 20th April 2020.

-o0o-

We received in post today the paperback copy I purchased on line.  You did a marvelous job of capturing the adventure and charm of not only your Grandfather's life but also the spirit of the British seaman.  The pictures and paintings were excellent hope you find the original painting. You have documented an amazing time in British history and made it come to life for all who will read it.  Great job and thank you for the personalized edition.  My family will treasure it.

JI from USA. 20th March 2020.

-o0o-

Well, what a read! This book makes a truly fascinating read, you really get the feel of life on board a clipper ship in the days of the Teviotdale and Cutty Sark in the 1870's. The presentation of the book is very good, some awesome illustrations, paintings and artworks. Very well researched and described. This is a family with generations of seafarers, with both tragic stories and uplifting articles. A must read book, tell your friends.

RH - Wokingham, Berkshire. 31st March 2020

-o0o-

An excellent true story - well written.

SJ - Aldwick, W.Sussex. 29th February 2020

-o0o-

Wonderful true story written by one of the crew. More research by his grandson to find documents about the shipwreck , makes it more interesting.

EP - Bognor Regis, W.Sussex. 31st March 2020

-o0o-


Got a review you'd like to share?  

We'd love to hear your views about our Teviotdale book. Please send your reviews to us at: stuartmcewenjenkins@gmail.com
Thanks.

Teviotdale Reproduction Prints....

Clipper-Ship 'Teviotdale' 1876 Fine Art Reproduction Prints.  A series of four Clipper-Ship 'Teviotdale' 1876 special edition fine art 'Giclee' reproduction prints are now available.

These superb watercolour paintings have been crafted on commission of the author Stuart M Jenkins.  Our artists, Bryan J Phillips and Howard Birchmore are both renowned maritime artists with many works of art and commissions to their names.

The watercolour paintings were commissioned to illustrate The Final Voyage of the Clipper Ship Teviotdale in 1876.  A remarkable and true account of a frightening shipwreck and incredible human survival. This book is the real-life story of George Jenkins, a young sailor from Dundee who in 1876 survives the terror of being shipwrecked at sea when his ship full of coal catches fire in the Indian Ocean.  George's personal recollections of the fateful voyage of the Teviotdale are carefully transcribed by his grandson Stuart Jenkins and with additional research, verify the events with the official Board of Trade report and newspaper articles from the period.

To be the proud owner of a Teviotdale Clipper-Ship 1876 Fine Art Reproduction Print contact us by e-mail at stuartmcewenjenkins@gmail.com
and we will be back in touch with you shortly.

To find out more about our series of Teviotdale images click on an image below to go to our Print Sales page (opens in new window):

Image of Teviotdale

Clicking on your favorite scenario from the story will take you to the Print Sales page (opens in new window) where you can select from:

Scudding Along,
In the Doldrums,
Running Easting Down and
Teviotdale on Fire!

 


© 2020 Website design by Robert Hughes Photography.uk
© Stuart McEwen Jenkins